Snoop Dogg

Snoop Dogg
The history of hip hop music is full of artists who blazed brightly and then just as quickly faded away. Few rappers have been able to match the staying power of Snoop Dogg, o­ne of the genre's most recognizable stars. His name is virtually synonymous with gangsta-rap; along with Dr. Dre he was instrumental in bringing the west coast sound into the mainstream.

Snoop Dogg got started with music at a fairly young age, singing and playing piano with his fellow church members. He started rapping a few years later as an adolescent. At the time he was known by the name Calvin Broadus although his mother was already calling him “Snoopy.” After high school and a brief stint in the pen Snoop got his big break.

Up-and-coming producer Dr. Dre happened to hear young Snoop freestyling o­n a mixtape, and o­ne of hip-hop's great creative relationships was started. The fledgling rap star signed o­n with Death Row records for a number of appearances as Snoop Doggy Dogg o­n Dre's “The Chronic” album as well as his own solo debut “Doggystyle.” This album was a smash hit, giving us the oft-covered and unforgettable single “Gin and Juice.”

Death Row records went through some trying times after that and after releasing “Tha Doggfather” Snoop left the label as fast as he was able. He has since recorded for Master P's No Limit Records, Capitol, Geffen, and Priority Records. Snoop's career has extended far beyond the audio studio. He is an actor who has played many roles and it would seem that Snoop is the go-to guy any time a particularly pimp-tastic character is needed. He also took his place behind the camera when he directed 2000's “Snoop Dogg's Doggystyle,” an adult film produced by Huster Entertainment.